Falling In Reverse, ‘Coming Home’

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Our Rating

Overall7.7
One small step for the punk music scene, one giant leap for Falling In Reverse. The Ronnie Radke fronted band's spacely, fourth installment is a curveball thrown from left field, yet a major advancement in the Las Vegas natives' storied career.
7.7

One small step for the punk music scene, one giant leap for Falling In Reverse. The Ronnie Radke fronted band’s spacely, fourth installment is a curveball thrown from left field, yet a major advancement in the Las Vegas natives’ storied career. Falling in Reverse isn’t unknown in the scene by any stretch of the imagination and their fanbase leans to either the hate ’em or love ’em side of the spectrum. There’s very few in-betweeners.

Vocally, Radke is as unique as they come and very much an acquired taste. Although, the vocalist approaches the introductory songs in a mature, refined way. The leadoff title track is nothing like Falling In Reverse has released to date. The electronics are heightened and the iconic FIR catchiness is cranked to level 10. “Coming Home”, written about Radke’s daughter, Willow, and the regular seperation from her, accentuates the album’s top-notch production from veteran Michael “Elvis” Baskette, the supervisor behind Escape The Fate’s Dying is Your Latest Fashion and The Amity Affliction’s Chasing Ghosts.

This trend continues through singles “Broken” and “Loser” – surely the album’s most popular songs. The songs take on a more emotional and heartfelt approach leaving Radke’s experimental rapping absent (for the time being). The string of songs eludes to the band’s dedication to the album and diligence to recreate their sound while keeping those renowned unique qualities that FIR fans love. The band feels tighter and much more cohesive that albums past. The additions of lead guitarist Christian Thompson and bassist Zakk Sandler fit the bill (Jacky Vincent can rest assured that his former band found a viable replacement).

Lyrically, the majority of the album features the famous Radke one-liners, a treat for the OG FIR faithful. From “I Hate Everyone” to “I’m Bad At Life”, Coming Home wouldn’t be complete without lyrics “Oh, if I could cast a spell, I would send you straight to hell” and “You think you’re so goddamn cool, everybody thinks you’re a fucking fool”.

Unlike records’ past, the pain in Radke’s voice is prominent amongst the self-deprecating words. It’s one of the many factors that sets Coming Home apart from Falling In Reverse’s previous work. It’s not a stretch by any means to declare Coming Home the band’s best album to date. Falling In Reverse excels in honing the distinctive characteristics that built the band’s foundation in a record that deserves recognition.

About author

Jared Allen

Jared Allen

Jared is a music journalist, photographer and avid music listener living in Charlotte, NC. He enjoys live music, long car rides with Kellin Quinn and trips to the local record store, even though he still doesn't own a turntable in fear that his roommates will evict him.

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